success story

Bonnie Bee

Bonnie Bee

Bonnie Bee is a heartworm survivor! She is also sweet as can be. Lucky for Bonnie, her heartworm infection was detected with a routine heartworm test screening, before she developed symptoms.

Pawco

Pawco

Pawco came in a couple weeks ago, very sick. He had eaten a bone the night before from a roast, and the next day was vomiting and extremely weak. Some of the pieces of bone had become lodged in his ileum-the portion of intestine just in front of the colon. He ended up having to have his entire ileum removed, along with a portion of his colon. He has recovered very well! Because the ileum is the only place that the body absorbs vitamin B, he will need to have monthly injections of this vitamin from now on. But, his prognosis is good and we are happy for him and his very sweet and loving owner.

Mary Lou

Mary Lou

Sweet Mary Lou is a 9 month old Boxer puppy that came to us a few weeks ago after being hit by a car and suffering severe head trauma and a fractured pelvis. After weeks of care and surgery to start to repair her pelvis, she is finally able to stand on her own and walk with some support from a sling. She will need additional surgeries as well as months of after care until she'll be able to walk on her own again.

Mary Lou is such a sweet girl. Even though she's been through so much, her tail never seems to stop wagging and she'll cover you with kisses at every opportunity. She will need a very loving home after her recovery. Her new family must be patient and be understanding that she may have some limitations even after she is released from the hospital. If you're interested in adopting Mary Lou, please email us at rescue@allvalleyanimal.com.

If you would like to donate to Mary Lou and the other animals like her, you can visit https://goo.gl/UGFpUJ.

Audi

Audi

Poor Audi fell about 30 feet off a ledge while hiking with her family. She suffered a torn lung (pneumothorax) as well as a fractured scapula and nerve damage to her front leg. Luckily her lung healed nicely, and her nerve function appears to be slowly improving. Using the water treadmill helps Audi work the muscles of the nerve damaged leg without having to bear weight on her fractured scapula. We are thrilled to see her constantly improving!

Zoey

Zoey

Did you know All Valley has endoscopes? In the photo below is an x-ray from Zoey. The bright curvilinear structure in her stomach is an end-on view of a piece of a tennis ball she swallowed. Luckily, we were able to remove it using an endoscope, which is less invasive than surgery, less painful, and has a much quicker recovery. Scoping is also less expensive than surgery. While not all objects can be successfully retrieved this way, it is always great when it is possible. Endoscopy is also useful to obtain GI biopsies when needed, helping us to diagnose a variety of conditions ranging from stomach ulcers to inflammatory bowel disease.

Daisy

Daisy

Cute little Daisy came to us a couple years ago for lethargy and not eating. Blood work showed elevated liver values. After only responding with mild improvement to initial treatment, and ruling out several infections, her owners opted to pursue liver biopsy. Biopsy results helped us to better understand what treatments may help and to learn more about her long term prognosis. Thankfully, Daisy responded well and her liver values went completely back to normal. She has been normal for over almost 2 years now and we are very happy for her.

Atticus,

Atticus,

This handsome and gentle giant was visiting us recently and had no problem watching out the office door window. Atticus came down with an unexplained fever a few months ago. Initial testing failed to find a cause and he seemed to get better at first. A few days later, however, he was declining again. We noticed a mildly increased respiratory rate and rechecked chest x- rays. This time they showed a tiny amount of fluid. The fluid was tapped and found to be a bacterial infection- a condition called pythorax. Moderate to severe pythorax cases require chest tubes for treatment and several days of intensive care. But in Atticus' s case, it was found so early and was still so mild it could be treated with aggressive antibiotics. Now he is doing great! His case is a good example of why sometimes tests need to be repeated. It is also a good example of how addressing potential illnesses early can save a lot of pain, suffering, and money.

Bear

Bear

Here Is Bear on the day of his final suture removal- a triumphant day for all involved! Several months ago Bear somehow got his skin caught on an unknown object and came home with a massive wound on his side. It stretched from top of his back to under his belly, and all the skin in between was pulled back. The next picture is immediately after surgery. Unfortunately, a few days later, it was apparent that a good portion of the skin lost it's blood supply and died ( see third picture). He had a second surgery to remove the dead skin. Over the next few months Bear healed with a combination of bandage changes every few days and five separate surgeries. His amazing owner was committed to getting him healed. We are so happy this great dog his owner can finally resume their normal life together!

Zeke

Zeke

Zeke is a strikingly handsome and amazingly good natured husky who has endeared himself to all the staff and doctors who meet him. Zeke was an unlucky boy who found himself at a shelter. His first adopter returned him to the shelter when he found out that Zeke has a type of skin cancer called a Mast Cell Tumor. Thankfully, Zeke’s current dad could see he was a special boy and adopted him anyway, determined to help him as much as he could.
The mass has been biopsied and determined to be “low grade”, which means a lot less likely to spread. We have also checked for spread with ultrasound and bloodwork and lymph node testing and have not found evidence the cancer has spread at this time. However, it is located in a spot– on his ankle (tarsus)– that makes it very difficult to remove. To preserve his leg, Zeke’s owners have opted for surgery to debulk the tumor, which was performed this past weekend. In a couple weeks, he is headed for Washington State Vet Teaching Hospital for a new and somewhat experimental treatment called “electrochemotherapy”. This involves several treatments where a chemo agent is injected into the tumor site, and then shocked with an electric wave. It is a good alternative for owners whose time and/or financial constraints do not allow for radiation therapy. We are hopeful and excited for Zeke!

Louie

Louie

This little cutie got himself into a whole load of trouble when he decided to raid his mom’s medicine cabinet!  Louie ate several pills of several different types of medications, and came to us completely disoriented and having severe seizures and tremors.  Because Louie’s symptoms were so severe, he had to be sedated for several hours to control the seizures. He was also given a substance called Intralipid intravenously.  This is a lipid emulsification that can, interestingly, not only be used for partial IV nutrition, but also to help bind drugs in the blood stream.  This was especially useful in this case because Louie could not take in anything by mouth due to the sedation.  Louie was monitored closely, and after a couple days made a full recovery. 

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Sassy

Sassy

Sassy was such a brave, sweet patient, which is why we can’t believe anyone would be cruel enough to shoot her with an air pellet gun! The bullet entered Sassy’s abdomen, penetrating her colon in 2 places, her small intestine, her pancreas, and finally lodging in one end of her right kidney. She is such a trooper that you would never know how sick she was when she first came in. Sassy went to surgery, and Dr Kevin Knighton did a fantastic job repairing the damage, including having to remove a small portion of her intestine. She stayed at the hospital for almost a week. For awhile we didn’t know if she would make it. But she did and her owners report she is doing well! We are so excited for Sassy and her loving, devoted owners. We are also proud of our excellent doctors and staff who helped Sassy pull through this ordeal. Sassy, you’re one special and fantastic kitty!